John kissing his beloved daughter Kate

John kissing his beloved daughter Kate

Kate with Julia and John at her side. She is holding her first place trophy after winning her school's speech contest.

Kate with Julia and John at her side. She is holding her first place trophy after winning her school’s speech contest.

John and Julia Hallisy’s daughter Kate was first diagnosed with retinoblastoma of both eyes at the age of 5 months. She required 2 years of aggressive chemotherapy and radiation, as well as removal of her right eye. She appeared to be cancer free until age 8 when she developed severe pain in her right upper thigh. She quickly underwent a biopsy that confirmed the worst, she had a second tumor, osteosarcoma, a bone tumor that can on occasion accompany retinoblastoma.

Her surgeon planned to resect the tumor and leave sufficient bone to allow her to have a functioning leg. However, a preventable postoperative infection got in the way. Within 48 hours of her biopsy, Kate became hypotensive due to Staphyloccocus aureus sepsis resulting in respiratory and kidney failure. She underwent an incision and drainage of the infected biopsy site, received prolonged intravenous antibiotics, required ventilator support, and remained in the intensive care unit for 7 weeks.  Painful bedsores also complicated her hospitalization.

The delay in treatment of her osteosarcoma resulted in continued growth of the tumor. As a consequence her leg had to be amputated above the knee two weeks after her discharge from the ICU. Kate’s parents were devastated, but John insisted, “We’re not going to mourn for her while she is still alive. We’ll have the rest of our lives for that. Our job is to make the most of every minute we do have.”

Kate’s last 19 months of life were extremely hard. Kate suffered from severe phantom limb pain, a well-known complication of amputation. The damage to her lungs during her septic episode reduced her ventilatory function to 70% of normal leaving her breathless when she tried to walk with her heavy prosthesis. She experienced severe post-traumatic stress from her intensive care experience frequently awaking after a nightmare or after wetting her bed. Through all her suffering Kate maintained a positive spirit and tried to look at the bright side of her predicament. After the loss of her leg she told her parents “You know, I will be able to walk again with a prosthetic leg. Some people lose both legs or a leg and an arm. I have it easier than they do.”

Julia and John will never forget their courageous and beautiful daughter. Following her daughter’s death Julia has been working as a patient advocate keeping Kate’s memory alive. Through her advocacy organization The Empowered Patient Coalition http://www.empoweredpatientcoalition.org she has reached out to other patients harmed by medical errors, and has documented over 500 hundred stories of pain and suffering.

Problem: Kate suffered a preventable Staphylococcus aureus infection following a “routine” biopsy that resulted in septic shock, respiratory and renal failure. The delays required to treat this infection prevented limb sparing surgery and necessitated an above the knee amputation.

Solution: It is likely that the skin overlying Kate’s biopsy site was not properly washed to remove surface Staphylococcus aureus. Prior to any invasive procedure the operative area should be thoroughly cleaned with Chlorhexidine. It is also possible that the biopsy instrument was contaminated with S. aureus and reliable procedures must be in place to assure that all surgical instruments are thoroughly heat sterilized.