Archives for category: tort reform

I haven’t posted in quite awhile. Why? Because for the last 6 months I have devoted over 125 hours to creating a course that will provide you with the tools to fix our healthcare delivery system. Every system is designed to produce the results it achieves, and unfortunately at this time our healthcare systems are inadvertently designed to harm patients.  You will learn how to apply the principles that high performing manufacturing systems to continually improve quality, you will learn how to apply the lessons you learned in team sports to becoming an integral member of your healthcare team. When patients become part of the healthcare team they are far more likely to receive higher quality, safer and more efficient care. You will learn how to recognize impending errors and dangerous conditions so that you can avoid harm. One of the most important lessons I will be teaching is how you can become an adaptive leader, a leader who can bring about change, and goodness knows our health systems need to undergo dramatic changes. And finally I will teach you how to organize others to achieve the goal of continually improving healthcare delivery. The course is free and it is offered through the University of Florida and Coursera. The Institute of Healthcare Improvement with the help of Michael Briddon has generously offered a number of teaching modules that have been incorporated into our course. Upon completing the course you can become part of the solutions. If everyone makes one or two small improvements every week or month our systems of healthcare delivery will steadily improve. WE ALL CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE.

https://www.coursera.org/course/fixinghealthcare

We have a supermarket chain in Florida called Publix. George Jenkins founded this remarkable company in 1930 at Winter Park, Florida. The success of his company has always been based on customer service. As he told his employees at the end of each orientation, “If there is ever a customer you can’t handle, give them my phone number, because I will.”

Publix has a guarantee posted in every store that reads:

“Publix guarantees that we will never knowingly disappoint you. If for any reason your purchase does not give you complete satisfaction, the full purchase price will be cheerfully refunded immediately upon request. We have always believed that no sale is complete until the meal is eaten and enjoyed.”

Publix has been rated by Fortune Magazine as one of the top ten best companies to work for (2005–2008) and is one of Forbes Magazine’s top ten largest private companies (2009). Publix consistently scores higher than any other supermarket for customer satisfaction based on the national American Customer Satisfaction Index survey (1995–2010). (See Critically Ill: A 5-point plan to cure health care delivery)

Publix attributes its success to a continual focus on its customers. The key question arises, if Publix supermarkets can guarantee their food after it leaves the store shouldn’t our health care systems be willing to guarantee the care they provide to their patients after they leave the hospital or clinic? Stories like those of Jess, Carla, Marty, Veronica, and Georjean, would never have to be told. Imagine if each time a medical error occurred, the caregiver and health system immediately informed the patient, deeply and sincerely apologized, explained how the health system was taking steps to prevent the same error from harming others, and then fairly compensated the patient.  Patients injured by medical errors would no longer feel as though they were being ostracized. They would no longer lose their trust in our medical system. They would no longer be suffering the financial hardship brought on by their injuries. After all, these injuries were not the fault of the patient. Why have the very institutions whose charge is to help those in need turned their backs on the patients who morally and ethically most deserve their help? When our health systems and caregivers make mistakes, shouldn’t they do everything in their power to help those they have injured?